A collection of thoughts and images. 

When clothes are reduced to categories, disconnect for me begins. In analysing catwalk trends there is a danger of sorting, explaining and reducing what is seen. And while my livestream seat is excellent, the filtering of sensory experience through a screen is a kind of mimesis. A glorious portal, but a reality once-removed, perhaps contributing to my disconnect. Even if I was there, chances are I'd be a back seat viewer, which makes me wonder which I would prefer, to see the clothes or to see the show? The tension between the two is an evolving conversation and I'd recommend Angelo Flaccavento and Alexander Fury for further reading. As humans we desire newness. From the fashion industry, we demand it. So the pursuit begins, ending for many with the catwalks. That is why I find myself filtering inspiration to be produced and then sold. It is a business first. Last week, I got lost ticking trend boxes, making connections between products, assimilating ideas. I forgot why I chose this. It's never going to be just about the clothes. For some that is their love. For me, it's about humanity. It is our creativity, expression and practicality. Clothes are important because someone has created it and someone wears it. As simple and complex as that.  References Gary Hume, Older, 2002 | Osma Harvilahti  Laundry, Kenya, 2013 | Hiro (Yasuhiro Wakabayashi)  Black evening dress in flight, NY, 1963 | Osma Harvilahti Pool, Dioulasso, 2014

When clothes are reduced to categories, disconnect for me begins. In analysing catwalk trends there is a danger of sorting, explaining and reducing what is seen. And while my livestream seat is excellent, the filtering of sensory experience through a screen is a kind of mimesis. A glorious portal, but a reality once-removed, perhaps contributing to my disconnect. Even if I was there, chances are I'd be a back seat viewer, which makes me wonder which I would prefer, to see the clothes or to see the show?

The tension between the two is an evolving conversation and I'd recommend Angelo Flaccavento and Alexander Fury for further reading.

As humans we desire newness. From the fashion industry, we demand it. So the pursuit begins, ending for many with the catwalks. That is why I find myself filtering inspiration to be produced and then sold. It is a business first. Last week, I got lost ticking trend boxes, making connections between products, assimilating ideas. I forgot why I chose this.

It's never going to be just about the clothes. For some that is their love. For me, it's about humanity. It is our creativity, expression and practicality. Clothes are important because someone has created it and someone wears it. As simple and complex as that. 

References

Gary Hume, Older, 2002 | Osma Harvilahti  Laundry, Kenya, 2013 | Hiro (Yasuhiro Wakabayashi)  Black evening dress in flight, NY, 1963 | Osma Harvilahti Pool, Dioulasso, 2014


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JulieMacindoe_2014_Line2.png
Artificial is not confined to the false or contrived with the created often an homage to the naturally occurring. The synthetic dystopian futures we imagined remain grounded with mineral textures, aged patinas and gently weighted dips and folds. References Sienna King by Agnes Llyod-Platt Fashion Futures | Tan Ngiap Heng long exposure dance photography | Francoise Morellet  Quadrature du Carre No. 1, 2007 | Recom Arthouse and Tom Price Liquid Simulation | Takuro Kuwata sculpture Amanda Murphy by Benjamin Alexander Huseby V #92 Winter 14/15 | Olafur Eliasson Riverbed, 2014-15 | Ann Sofie Back AW14 by Benjamin Mallek  Thisispaper | Alexandre Francois/ CCCLXXIX Annees-Lumiere | Style Heroine Flipping Sides, October 27, 2014 | Martin Azua vase with stone | Julia Bergshoeff by Karim Sadli Poetic Justice for The New York Times T Style Winter Luxury 2014 | Alexandre Francois/ CCCLXXIX Annees-Lumiere

Artificial is not confined to the false or contrived with the created often an homage to the naturally occurring. The synthetic dystopian futures we imagined remain grounded with mineral textures, aged patinas and gently weighted dips and folds.

References
Sienna King by Agnes Llyod-Platt Fashion Futures | Tan Ngiap Heng long exposure dance photography | Francoise Morellet  Quadrature du Carre No. 1, 2007 | Recom Arthouse and Tom Price Liquid Simulation | Takuro Kuwata sculpture
Amanda Murphy by Benjamin Alexander Huseby V #92 Winter 14/15 | Olafur Eliasson Riverbed, 2014-15 | Ann Sofie Back AW14 by Benjamin Mallek  Thisispaper | Alexandre Francois/ CCCLXXIX Annees-Lumiere | Style Heroine Flipping Sides, October 27, 2014 | Martin Azua vase with stone | Julia Bergshoeff by Karim Sadli Poetic Justice for The New York Times T Style Winter Luxury 2014 | Alexandre Francois/ CCCLXXIX Annees-Lumiere


To splice is to join or to insert, altering the current structure to form a new combination. It can disrupt a previously seamless whole to become something fragmented and abstracted. The new seams cannot be hidden even with the smoothest join. But rather than scar the new formation, surely it is preferable for it to become part of the new, like smile lines worn through the decades. Lines that are worn, not hidden. References Coat Tails Lina Zhang by Marcus Ohlsson for Marie Claire, June 2012 | The second image I could only track down as far as tumblr (where many good images go to live uncredited) but here it is on pinterest. If you know the credits, please let me know so I can update. Sadly, this can also be framed as a comment on race in the fashion industry.  

To splice is to join or to insert, altering the current structure to form a new combination. It can disrupt a previously seamless whole to become something fragmented and abstracted. The new seams cannot be hidden even with the smoothest join. But rather than scar the new formation, surely it is preferable for it to become part of the new, like smile lines worn through the decades. Lines that are worn, not hidden.

References
Coat Tails Lina Zhang by Marcus Ohlsson for Marie Claire, June 2012 | The second image I could only track down as far as tumblr (where many good images go to live uncredited) but here it is on pinterest. If you know the credits, please let me know so I can update. Sadly, this can also be framed as a comment on race in the fashion industry.

 


In the current Age of the Anthropocene, defined by human interference with nature, material exploration reverts common man-made materials back into those resembling nature. And with plastics set to be the new fossils and our oceans host to the plastisphere, these new materials give the illusion of wilderness in a constructed environment. See the transformative and textural work of Sophie Rowley or the crafted, fragile destructions of Faustine Steinmetz. References Alessandro Puccinelli  Intersections | Maja Salamon by Agata Pospieszyriska Vogue Ukraine October 2014 | Sophie Rowley  Material Exploration | Elisa Sednaoui by Peter Lindbergh Vogue Italia, September 2012 | SS15 Rodarte by Lea Colombo Dazed Digital | Jenny Sinkaberg by Julia Hetta Rodeo Spring 2011 | Lisa-Robinson Etching, Lake Superior, Wisconsin, 2009 

In the current Age of the Anthropocene, defined by human interference with nature, material exploration reverts common man-made materials back into those resembling nature. And with plastics set to be the new fossils and our oceans host to the plastisphere, these new materials give the illusion of wilderness in a constructed environment. See the transformative and textural work of Sophie Rowley or the crafted, fragile destructions of Faustine Steinmetz.

References
Alessandro Puccinelli  Intersections | Maja Salamon by Agata Pospieszyriska Vogue Ukraine October 2014 | Sophie Rowley  Material Exploration | Elisa Sednaoui by Peter Lindbergh Vogue Italia, September 2012 | SS15 Rodarte by Lea Colombo Dazed Digital | Jenny Sinkaberg by Julia Hetta Rodeo Spring 2011 | Lisa-Robinson Etching, Lake Superior, Wisconsin, 2009 


We live in a visual culture yet our experience of our selves is limited visually. I can feel the expression on my face, but it is others who see them. Similarly, I can use clothes as an expression of self but it is other's who view this expression the most. My view is fleeting and obscured, with glances angled from above or a posed reflection. We see in partial what others see in full; the morning's control rather than the day's abandon. So with a limited view, we experience our dress as much through other sensory stimuli. The swish of fringing, unexpected air gusts, or fabric swirling around your legs. Feelings of being bundled, feelings of moving freely, rippling the surface of the fabric like a duck ripples a pond. The sound of corduroy thighs or sequins jostling for a glimmer. Pulling at a pilling knit. Hitching, adjusting, smoothing and twirling; this is how we experience clothes. Textural fabrics continue to dominant fabric trends, perhaps balancing our current visual overload with the sense of touch. Rugged knits, slubbed and nepped jerseys, natural state wovens, crafted abrasions, needled-punched denim, all offer the wearer heightened texture.  Future technologies will take the experience even further with the development of smart textiles collecting data and negotiating between our bodies and our environment, bringing us greater understanding of ourselves (Amanda Parker). We've already seen Ralph Lauren incorporate biometrics into their Polo Tech tee unveiled at the US Open this year. And today $3.5 million was granted to the Manufacturing Innovation Hub for Apparel, Textiles & Wearable Tech in New York. This is such an exciting area of development, exploring through technology what the experience of dress could be in the future. References Henri Matisse Papercut 1947 | Carmen Kass by Philip Gay Marie Claire Spain, July 2014

We live in a visual culture yet our experience of our selves is limited visually. I can feel the expression on my face, but it is others who see them. Similarly, I can use clothes as an expression of self but it is other's who view this expression the most. My view is fleeting and obscured, with glances angled from above or a posed reflection. We see in partial what others see in full; the morning's control rather than the day's abandon.

So with a limited view, we experience our dress as much through other sensory stimuli. The swish of fringing, unexpected air gusts, or fabric swirling around your legs. Feelings of being bundled, feelings of moving freely, rippling the surface of the fabric like a duck ripples a pond. The sound of corduroy thighs or sequins jostling for a glimmer. Pulling at a pilling knit. Hitching, adjusting, smoothing and twirling; this is how we experience clothes.

Textural fabrics continue to dominant fabric trends, perhaps balancing our current visual overload with the sense of touch. Rugged knits, slubbed and nepped jerseys, natural state wovens, crafted abrasions, needled-punched denim, all offer the wearer heightened texture. 

Future technologies will take the experience even further with the development of smart textiles collecting data and negotiating between our bodies and our environment, bringing us greater understanding of ourselves (Amanda Parker). We've already seen Ralph Lauren incorporate biometrics into their Polo Tech tee unveiled at the US Open this year. And today $3.5 million was granted to the Manufacturing Innovation Hub for Apparel, Textiles & Wearable Tech in New York. This is such an exciting area of development, exploring through technology what the experience of dress could be in the future.

References
Henri Matisse Papercut 1947 | Carmen Kass by Philip Gay Marie Claire Spain, July 2014


References Audrey Marnay by Herb Ritts | Enchanted Evening, US Vogue, September 1999 Alex Wek by Gilles Bensimon | Elle USA, March 1999

References
Audrey Marnay by Herb Ritts | Enchanted Evening, US Vogue, September 1999
Alex Wek by Gilles Bensimon | Elle USA, March 1999


When contemporary work is made, at what point does time require it to belong to the past rather than the present? As a temporal medium, dance must be performed to remain in existence. But whilst the work remains relatively unchanged, time enters the relationship, shifting and influencing perceptions and performance. Over the weekend I saw a retrospective of Trisha Brown repertoire, with works spanning from 1983 to 2011. As a postmodern choreographer, she gave herself 'permission to invent'. To invent indicates newness; searching for unknown answers. I wonder what she thinks of her older works now, works that have shaped the language of contemporary dance performed to audiences that have become familiar with her form. No longer contemporary works, but holding such value as moments in time. Fashion has a similar temporality to dance. It is bound to a time and season. Created and worn displaying parallels with created and performed.  Reference Malgosia Bela by Josh Olins  Shape Shifters, WSJ, June 2013

When contemporary work is made, at what point does time require it to belong to the past rather than the present?

As a temporal medium, dance must be performed to remain in existence. But whilst the work remains relatively unchanged, time enters the relationship, shifting and influencing perceptions and performance.

Over the weekend I saw a retrospective of Trisha Brown repertoire, with works spanning from 1983 to 2011. As a postmodern choreographer, she gave herself 'permission to invent'. To invent indicates newness; searching for unknown answers. I wonder what she thinks of her older works now, works that have shaped the language of contemporary dance performed to audiences that have become familiar with her form. No longer contemporary works, but holding such value as moments in time.

Fashion has a similar temporality to dance. It is bound to a time and season. Created and worn displaying parallels with created and performed. 

Reference
Malgosia Bela by Josh Olins  Shape Shifters, WSJ, June 2013


Everyday fragments confettied, celebrating the undoing of editing. With so much to filter, we have become adept at choice. What happens to the creative process when the outcome is to keep everything? A designer and a choreographer both asked the same question. Phoebe Philo for S/S'15 Celine was interested in the risk of uncertainty in the creative process as freedom from our obsession with editing. Whilst some saw this as a lack of cohesion, I really like the idea of allowing for creative chaos as a way of revealing latent synapses in the search of epiphanies and sense. It reminds me of one of my favourite dance works, Antony Hamilton's Keep Everything for Chunky Move.  Reference: Sam Rollinson by Alasdair McLellan | The Gentlewoman #10, Autumn/Winter 2014

Everyday fragments confettied, celebrating the undoing of editing.
With so much to filter, we have become adept at choice. What happens to the creative process when the outcome is to keep everything?

A designer and a choreographer both asked the same question.
Phoebe Philo for S/S'15 Celine was interested in the risk of uncertainty in the creative process as freedom from our obsession with editing. Whilst some saw this as a lack of cohesion, I really like the idea of allowing for creative chaos as a way of revealing latent synapses in the search of epiphanies and sense. It reminds me of one of my favourite dance works, Antony Hamilton's Keep Everything for Chunky Move

Reference:
Sam Rollinson by Alasdair McLellan | The Gentlewoman #10, Autumn/Winter 2014


Emma Oak by Stefan Zschernitz  Stylist France #58, 28th August 2014 | Lisa Sorgini Captum Orchis | Ana Beatriz Barros by Jason Lee Parry  Malibu Magazine, September 2014 | Sophie Rowley Illusionary set of interiors

Emma Oak by Stefan Zschernitz  Stylist France #58, 28th August 2014 | Lisa Sorgini Captum Orchis | Ana Beatriz Barros by Jason Lee Parry  Malibu Magazine, September 2014 | Sophie Rowley Illusionary set of interiors


indigo.jpg
Long-worn clothes become part of our identity. The preservation is not in the physical garment but in the wearing and becoming part of us. Because in the wearing, comes the fading and decay. Textures evolve; they become bonded, they fray. Colour fades, the spectrum seems to narrow in on a dirty medium. Ximon Lee was inspired by the dress of Russian street children for his Parson's graduation collection, creating the proportional and textural juxtapositions of found and worn remnants. I particularly liked his use of monochromatic layering of indigo, adding depth and shadow to the sandwich board shapes, whilst allowing the textures of the seemingly scavenged fabric to be revealed.  This shadow play is also found in the Japanese resist dyeing technique Katazome of using rice flour paste and stencils to create layered textiles. Well worth further research here or here or here. References Ximon Lee Children of Leningradksy, Parson's Graduate Collection | Naito Hideharu Katazome dyeing on linen | Ola Rudnicka by Richard Bush Numero #152 April 2014 | d-Arkroom Centuplum, Was ist Metaphysik?, via behance |Michael Chase, area of interest, 13 May 2012 | Michael Chase, area of interest, 22 May 2012 | Michael Chase, area of interest, 1 May 2012 | Nicholas Hawker, Observations, published 16 July 2014

Long-worn clothes become part of our identity. The preservation is not in the physical garment but in the wearing and becoming part of us. Because in the wearing, comes the fading and decay. Textures evolve; they become bonded, they fray. Colour fades, the spectrum seems to narrow in on a dirty medium. Ximon Lee was inspired by the dress of Russian street children for his Parson's graduation collection, creating the proportional and textural juxtapositions of found and worn remnants.

I particularly liked his use of monochromatic layering of indigo, adding depth and shadow to the sandwich board shapes, whilst allowing the textures of the seemingly scavenged fabric to be revealed. 

This shadow play is also found in the Japanese resist dyeing technique Katazome of using rice flour paste and stencils to create layered textiles. Well worth further research here or here or here.

References

Ximon Lee Children of Leningradksy, Parson's Graduate Collection | Naito Hideharu Katazome dyeing on linen | Ola Rudnicka by Richard Bush Numero #152 April 2014 | d-Arkroom Centuplum, Was ist Metaphysik?, via behance |Michael Chase, area of interest, 13 May 2012 | Michael Chase, area of interest, 22 May 2012 | Michael Chase, area of interest, 1 May 2012 | Nicholas Hawker, Observations, published 16 July 2014


Square pegs and round holes are a perfect visual match, with one balancing out the other. Balancing is not a static activity. There is movement and pause, tension and harmony. The roundness of one interrupting the the angled planes of the other. References Michael Chase Area of Interest, 29 january 2012, IMG 9651 | Mouvement De Mode Athena Wilson by Takay for Elle France, May 2014 | Modern Love Zen Sevastyanova by Catherine Servel for Harper's Bazaar UK, March 2013

Square pegs and round holes are a perfect visual match, with one balancing out the other. Balancing is not a static activity. There is movement and pause, tension and harmony. The roundness of one interrupting the the angled planes of the other.

References
Michael Chase Area of Interest, 29 january 2012, IMG 9651 | Mouvement De Mode Athena Wilson by Takay for Elle France, May 2014 | Modern Love Zen Sevastyanova by Catherine Servel for Harper's Bazaar UK, March 2013


A study in texture becomes a study in contrasts; soft, linear folds enveloped by nubbly tufts, the cool drape of one encased by the coarse warmness of the other. Or is the pile plush rather than coarse? Either way, a contrast of texture within the same palette allows the eye to freely explore differences and gain relief without the competing factor of colour. References Vanessa Jackman Street Shot | Bradley Walker Tomlin No.8, 1952 | Chad Wys Arrangement in Skintones 8, 2011 | Michel Blazy Bouquet Final Installation, via Afflante | Satsuki Shibuya Photo

A study in texture becomes a study in contrasts; soft, linear folds enveloped by nubbly tufts, the cool drape of one encased by the coarse warmness of the other. Or is the pile plush rather than coarse? Either way, a contrast of texture within the same palette allows the eye to freely explore differences and gain relief without the competing factor of colour.


References
Vanessa Jackman Street Shot | Bradley Walker Tomlin No.8, 1952 | Chad Wys Arrangement in Skintones 8, 2011 |
Michel Blazy Bouquet Final Installation, via Afflante | Satsuki Shibuya Photo


A line is an unbroken stretch upon which the eye can travel. Travel straight and there is a sense of definition and completion, while arch lines seem softer, mimicking natural forms and undulations. Repetition stimulates and soothes through pattern recognition. References Fan Ho | Approaching shadow, Hong Kong Yesterday, 1954 Michael Kenna or on Artsy | Conical Hedges, Versailles, France, 1988 William Keck | Reflection and Mirroring, 1939 Catherine Wales | Project DNA Angela Lindvall by Karl Lagerfeld | Chanel Fall, 1999 Izis Bidermanas | Lagny, 1959 Gwen Los by Michael Sanders | It's a breeze, Marie Claire, UK, January 2014 Marlene Dietrich by Milton H Greene | Photo 1952

A line is an unbroken stretch upon which the eye can travel. Travel straight and there is a sense of definition and completion, while arch lines seem softer, mimicking natural forms and undulations. Repetition stimulates and soothes through pattern recognition.

References
Fan Ho | Approaching shadow, Hong Kong Yesterday, 1954
Michael Kenna or on Artsy | Conical Hedges, Versailles, France, 1988
William Keck | Reflection and Mirroring, 1939
Catherine Wales | Project DNA
Angela Lindvall by Karl Lagerfeld | Chanel Fall, 1999
Izis Bidermanas | Lagny, 1959
Gwen Los by Michael Sanders | It's a breeze, Marie Claire, UK, January 2014
Marlene Dietrich by Milton H Greene | Photo 1952